The Impossible

Impossible

My friends, Faith and Kirk, are on their way to South America this week to adopt their sixteen year old daughter. Late last summer, Faith, a social worker by day, came across a Facebook post about a girl needing a forever-family by the end of 2016 or otherwise become ineligible for adoption due to her age according to the country’s adoption laws.

In a matter of a few hours, not only was Faith’s heart being tugged at for the girl, but her husband’s was as well. With faith that God was behind it and trusting Him to make it happen, Faith and Kirk said yes to the craziest whirlwind adventure of their lives yet.

Their decision to say yes was utterly impractical.

Before their daughter’s sixteenth birthday, which was only a couple of quick months away, Faith and Kirk had to be at a very specific point in the adoption process. If they weren’t far enough along, she couldn’t be adopted at that point because of her age. Time was not on their side.


Their decision to say yes was utterly impractical.


Faith and her husband already have two biological kids, both of them out of diapers but not yet old enough for school. It would be easier to wait until the kids were older.

The cost of international adoption would be astronomical for a small family already budgeting their monthly finances. It would be easier to wait and build up the savings account.

Neither Faith nor Kirk are prepared, like most parents, for a teenager, and even less prepared for a teenager who doesn’t speak the same language, lags several grades behind her peers, and brings with her years of emotional trauma already endured. It would be easier to adopt a younger child.

So much of the process would have to be rushed along; applications, approvals, visits and all through international adoption channels. It would be an arduous enough process without the looming deadline of adoption ineligibility. These circumstances would be nearly impossible.


These circumstances would be nearly impossible.


Opening their home and hearts to a girl they don’t really know is risky. She can reject their love or absorb every bit of it and still not trust it. There are no guarantees she will accept or return their love.

Looking at what’s to come, Faith admits there’s fear and hesitation in wondering if she’s up for the challenge, but the more she shares, the more obvious it becomes that she and Kirk are not alone in this. Story after story that they already have; times when God came through, showed them favor, took care of things months in advance before they knew there would be a need. Paperwork, legal proceedings, translators and 2700 miles of separation, Faith and Kirk can tell you all about God’s resources.


Story after story that they already have; times when God came through, showed them favor, took care of things months in advance before they knew there would be a need.


From a worldly perspective, they’ve given up a lot. Kirk’s vacation days are used up for the rest of the year. Faith’s dream to renovate the kitchen will remain a dream for a long time to come. The single-bathroom home was too small even before now. Gone too are the five-year plan and the savings account.

Signed adoption papers won’t mark the end of sacrifice either, but instead the beginning. Their new daughter will need ESL classes, tutors, counseling and a myriad of other things still unknown. But they are choosing to trust that God, who managed to get Faith, Kirk and two toddlers on a plane to South America this week, will provide tomorrow. And the next day. And the day after that.


Because the challenges and impossibilities are where Faith and Kirk have seen God demonstrate His abundance and goodness.


When Faith talks about the adventure her family is on, it’s not the things they have given up of which she speaks. While she openly admits the challenges they’ve faced and the rollercoaster of emotions they’ve felt, her eyes light up. Because the challenges and impossibilities are where Faith and Kirk have seen God demonstrate His abundance and goodness. As Faith said last month, “There’s no going back now—and frankly we wouldn’t want to, even if we could!”

Because for Faith and Kirk, it’s about so much more than bringing their daughter home or the sacrifices they’re making to do so. It’s about saying “yes” to God when He asks you to let Him do the impossible.

One thought on “The Impossible

  1. Jere Watkins says:

    It is striking to me that the wife’s name is Faith and the father is Kirk ,and I think of Capt.Kirk of Star Trek. Great names to live up to but regardless of the noble names, the real power is in the Lord speaking and for them to listen…..and follow.
    Thank You Lord
    Jere

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